New York Times (January 27, 2019)

The January 27, 2019 New York Times article Elite Law Firm’s All-White Partner Class Stirs Debate on Diversity by Noam Scheiber and John Eligon featured a prominent quote from me. During the initial interview with Noam Scheiber, I was asked to offer my expert opinion on issues related to race and gender in elite corporate law firms. For more details on my research, check out my forthcoming book You Don’t Look Like A Lawyer: Black Women and Systemic Gendered Racism.

To access the full article, visit:  https://nyti.ms/2S7AsEq
To access the full article, visit:  https://nyti.ms/2S7AsEq

To access the full article, visit: https://nyti.ms/2S7AsEq

NBC Left Field (November 9, 2018)

I’m so happy to have had the opportunity to contribute to Simone Boyce’s documentary on NBC Left Field. Is Having to Wear Makeup Sexist is a segment that focuses on women and the use of makeup. My interview provides insight on the history of makeup use and how research has shown that beauty is often rewarded. Individuals deemed as attractive are favored over those who are not across various domains, including the workplace. I explain how this is prevalent for both women and men. Grooming plays a significant role in the ways that people are perceived as attractive, where beauty work (applying makeup, hair, dieting, clothes and even cosmetic surgery) is particularly salient for women (although men also benefit). Women who engage in beauty work to improve their appearance have strong incentives to do so, including higher pay and rates of promotion (Wong and Penner 2016). Studies have confirmed this, however, although women who wear makeup tend to be looked upon favorably (higher pay and promotion), there is a disadvantage that comes in the form of labor (emotional, mental, and physical), as well as financial burdens. Women are often disadvantaged in terms of the time spent applying makeup, the amount of money spent on grooming, and the unequal burden of conforming to gender stereotypes to be successful. Essentially, women spend more money buying beauty products and more time preparing for work without additional pay. They perform invisible labor that is not accounted for. Men are not required to spend additional time enhancing appearance to the degree that women engage. Instead they have the advantage utilizing this additional time to advance their careers by being able to work more overtime, spending more time training and developing skills, taking on additional responsibilities, or attending networking events. All of which have a high likelihood of leading to advancement opportunities which women tend to miss out on, and therefore diminishes their economic and promotion prospects.

A shorter version of the segment was also aired on the TODAY Show on NBC November 15, 2018.

For speaking and media inquiries call 917-553-3315 or email.tmwc@gmail.com.